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Copper Finned tube coil Murphy for hvacCopper Finned tube coil Murphy for hvac
Copper Finned tube coil Murphy for boiler bCopper Finned tube coil Murphy for boiler b
Copper Finned tube coil Murphy for boiler aCopper Finned tube coil Murphy for boiler a
Copper Finned tube coil Murphy for boilerCopper Finned tube coil Murphy for boiler

Condenser Coil

Fin Type: Coil

Tube Material: copper

Fin Material: Copper

Product description:

The condenser coil is where the heat is removed from the refrigerant. After the gas refrigerant is pressurized and heated in the compressor, it enters the condenser coil。 Simultaneously, the refrigerant cools and turns into a liquid. The air around the coil will start to heat up and is blown out of the outdoor unit.

How does condenser coil works

While the evaporator coil picks up heat from indoor air, the condenser coil releases heat into outdoor air. The load of heat energy extracted from your home and compressed in hot refrigerant vapor is rapidly released when refrigerant circulates into the coil and condenses to liquid.

What’s the Difference Between A/C Condenser coil and Evaporator Coils? 

Extracting indoor heat from the air and adding it to refrigerant is the function of the evaporator coil. Installed inside the indoor air handler, the evaporator is continuously exposed to the flow of warm air drawn by the system blower from individual rooms in the house through return ducts. 

Refrigerant circulating through copper tubes in the coil is a cold vapor around 40 degrees. In this state, the heat-absorbent properties of the refrigerant are maximized. Heat energy from the warm house airflow transfers through the chilled copper coil tubing and is readily absorbed by the refrigerant flow. With its heat energy extracted by the coil, the cooled airflow is pushed by the blower into the supply ducts and dispersed throughout the house. 

At the same time heat is being extracted, the warm air contacting frigid evaporator coil surfaces triggers condensation, which lowers the humidity level in the airflow, “conditioning” the air just as Willis Carrier designed over a century ago. After leaving the evaporator coil, refrigerant flows through an insulated conduit to the outdoor A/C component that’s usually directly behind the house. 

This cabinet contains both the compressor and the condenser coil. Refrigerant entering the compressor is pressurized, concentrating the molecules of heat energy and raising the temperature of the refrigerant vapor to over 100 degrees. This superheated state ensures efficient transfer of the heat energy into outdoor air, even when the outdoor temperature is high, such as on a hot summer day. 

The condenser coil is of similar design to the indoor evaporator coil. However, the difference between A/C evaporator and condenser coil is exactly reversed. While the evaporator coil picks up heat from indoor air, the condenser coil releases heat into outdoor air. The load of heat energy extracted from your home and compressed in hot refrigerant vapor is rapidly released when refrigerant circulates into the coil and condenses to liquid. 

As the refrigerant releases its heat load, a fan incorporated in the unit blows air through the condenser coil passages and heat is dispersed into outdoor air. High-pressure liquid refrigerant leaving the condenser coil makes a u-turn and flows back to the evaporator coil. An expansion valve before the evaporator restricts the flow of refrigerant, forcing it through a narrow orifice and converting it back to a vaporized state, ready to absorb more heat energy from your home.